Latest News

  • Back to the Ocean!

    Back to the Ocean!

    The Hawksbill Turtle that came to us last week, recovered very quickly. The very active turtle was released over the weekend back to the Indian Ocean.

    Discarded fishing nets, known as 'ghost nets' are a worldwide problem and cause many fatalaties in a variety of marine animals. This little Hawksbill, tangled in 3kg of ghost netting, was very lucky to be found by LOT team member Lewa on one of his early morning beach patrols. The turtle was able to recover from the bruising and regain strength in our Rehabilitation Centre before being released from Watamu beach.

  • New Patient in our Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre

    New Patient in our Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre

    This Hawksbill turtle was found by one of our nest monitors, Lewa, on his early morning beach patrol. The turtle was tangled in a large amount of discarded fishing nets. The nets had also entangled a sack which was full of sand and a substantially sized branch. This totalled nearly 3kg of weight for the turtle to drag around.

  • Turtle Release In Sunny Watamu

    Turtle Release In Sunny Watamu

    We love being able to share with you the special moment when we are able to release turtles back to the ocean. It's an everyday occurence for us here at Local Ocean Trust but that doesn't make it any less of a magical experience every time. This recent release from Watamu beach on a lovely sunny day was a juvenille Hawksbill turtle. This is a critically endangered species and each one we are able to release back into the ocean makes a huge difference in reduce the decline of Hawksbill turtle populations.

    Check out this video of our 11,158th release!

  • LOT's New Turtle Rescue and Release Car

    LOT's New Turtle Rescue and Release Car

    Today the dream became a reality and the new car went out for its first day on the job and didn't have much time to rest as 9 turtes needed our help. Amazingly the first turtle that needed to be rescued was none other than three flippered Captain Hook.

  • Education Programme 2nd Quarter Update

    Education Programme 2nd Quarter Update

    The LOT education programme is a great way for students to learn about the marine environment. University students on internships with us, those seeking work experience or those doing their Duke of Edinburgh award have been tremendously inspired and have gained skills relevant to their course. We are very proud of the students who spend time with us at the project and understand the need to conserve our oceans and proceed to create awareness back at school.

  • Nesting Programme 2nd Quarter Update

    Nesting Programme 2nd Quarter Update

    The weather has been very cool in Watamu and the tides just perfect for nesting turtles. It is the low season and the SE monsoon winds have deposited sea weed and all things trash on Watamu beach. Not to be deterred the nesting females have made 24 nests this quarter.

Watamu Turtle Watch and Local Ocean Trust

Local Ocean Trust is a private, not for profit organisation committed to the protection of Kenya's marine environment. We love our local ocean and we use practical conservation, community involvement and development, education, research and campaigning to promote the sustainable use of Kenya's marine resources.

Watamu Turtle Watch is our flagship programme. It was started by local residents in 1997 to protect nesting sea turtles. Now it consists of our Nest Monitoring and Protection programme, By Catch Net Release Programme, and specialist Rehabilitation Centre for sick and injured sea turtles. The combination of these programmes enables us to make a real difference in ensuring the future of endagered sea turtles.


Business Hours

If you've found a turtle or a nest please call +254 713 990823
You can contact our office on +254 713 759627
Our centre is open to visitors:
Mon 14.00 - 16.00
Tues - Fri 09.30 - 12.00 and 14.00 - 16.00
Sat 09.30 - 12.00
Sun - closed

Contact Us